Dr Matthew Banks

Dr Matthew Banks

Dr Matthew Banks BSc MB FRCP PhD

Welcome to my website

I am a consultant gastroenterologist at University College London Hospitals (UCLH) where I have been director of endoscopy for 6 years, leading a world renowned unit & also the largest Barrett’s oesophagus centre in the UK. I work privately in Harley Street, The Lister Hospital Chelsea, The London Clinic and Princess Grace Hospitals where I founded a team of gastroenterologist and surgeons, The London Gastrointestinal Associates. Before I moved to UCLH I was Director of Endoscopy at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital. I am also a Senior Lecturer at The National Medical Laser Centre, University College London (UCL).

I co-host the largest live endoscopy conference in the UK and frequently run endoscopy courses for consultants to refine their own skills. I am the editor of ‘Endoscopy in the Cancer Patient’, Endoscopy Editor in The Faculty of 1000 and have written numerous scientific papers, reviews and book chapters. Investigating the mechanisms of diarrhea during my PhD allowed me to appreciate the physiology of bowel disorders including constipation, diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome.

I was able to refine his techniques during an endoscopic fellowship in Sydney and a sabbatical in Tokyo’s prestigious National Cancer Centre. I am now one of a select few National Endoscopy trainers with exemplary performance standards, particularly in colonoscopy

My expertise:

I see and manage all general gastrointestinal problems, however I have particular expertise in the following areas:

  • Heartburn and indigestion
  • Barrett’s oesophagus, screening and treatment for dysplasia
  • HALO radiofrequency ablation
  • Barrett’s EMR
  • Bowel cancer screening and polyp detection
  • Constipation and diarrhoea
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Oesophageal and gastric cancer
  • Endoscopy, colonoscopy & endoscopic therapy
  • Laser therapy
  • Polypectomy
  • Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR)
  • Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)
  • Acute gastrointestinal bleeding treatment

 

My research interests:

I am part of a research group at UCL studying Barrett’s oesophagus, in particular the detection of early cancers in the oesophagus, stomach and colon.

Private Consultant Gastroenterologist London

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Acid reflux and indigestion

Acid reflux and indigestion
What is indigestion?
Indigestion has many different interpretations including heartburn, reflux, discomfort in the chest and upper belly after eating, belching and regurgitation. These symptoms may be caused by acid reflux (Regurgitation of acid from the stomach into the gullet (Oesophagus), other rarer oesophageal problems or stomach (gastric) problems. It is rarely dangerous and is very common, at least 1 in 3 people suffering from one of these symptoms.
Please see our pages on heartburn and Barrett’s oesophagus for more information.
How do you treat indigestion?
There are a few lifestyle modifications which can be of help:
The first is to avoid eating late. and leave at least 4 hours before going to bed if you have had a heavy meal.
Meals high in fat also delay stomach emptying and increase reflux so avoid large, heavy meals
Irritating foods such as those high in spices (Chilli), vinegar and citrus fruits/juices should be avoided
Avoid caffeine
Reduce alcohol consumption
Medicines for indigestion
Antacids such as Gaviscon can reduce symptoms rapidly. Take them when your symptoms are most common, for example after food or before bed.
Medicines which reduce acid production include ranitidine (An H2 antagonist) and omeprazole (A proton pump inhibitor). These are best taken 30-60 minutes before food for the best effect. They can be bought in low dose in pharmacies but need a prescription for higher dose.
If any of your symptoms persist despite treatment, or you are older than 40 and the symptoms are new, we would suggest seeing your doctor.
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Gastroscopy

Gastroscopy

This involves a small flexible tube with a light source and camera (endoscope) being placed through the mouth (usually under sedation) to assess the oesophagus, stomach and small bowel. It takes around 10 minutes, but may be longer if additional procedures are undertaken. These might include taking tissue samples (biopsies) treatment for bleeding, blockages (stenting) or removing early cancer.

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Laser Therapy

Laser Therapy

Laser therapy is used in gastroenterology to treat many conditions including the following:

  • oesophageal cancers
  • stomach cancers
  • Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE)
  • Colon cancers (Bowel cancer)

During a gastroscopy or colonoscopy, a laser fibre is passed through the scope. A laser light is then used to destroy tissue. The technique is undertaken at:

  • The London Clinic
  • University College London Hospital
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